27 August 2015

copper-alloy horse mount

copper-alloy horse mount

Further analysis of the Anglo-Saxon decorated horse mount reveals even more information about how it may have been acquired by the inhabitants of Trusty’s Hill. X-Ray Fluorescence analysis of the mount shows that it comprised of leaded brass with a higher concentration of zinc than found in either the crucibles or moulds from Trusty’s Hill. Leaded brass is more common in Anglo-Saxon England where Roman bronze objects (which were commonly composed of leaded brass) were melted down as a source material for metalworking. Despite the proximity of Trusty’s Hill to the Irish Sea trade networks that could have brought scrap metal to the site, the high lead contents in the crucibles and the lead ingot recovered from the site suggests that the craftsmen here were not re-casting either Roman or Anglo-Saxon metal, but using other sources to produce ornaments of leaded bronze not leaded brass. It seems unlikely therefore that the Trusty’s Hill mount was produced at the workshop at this site.

The Trusty’s Hill mount may have come to the site as part of a complete horse bridle or as an object already removed. There are various explanations: it could have been a gift to the household at Trusty’s Hill, it may have been traded to the smiths here or it may have been looted from a battlefield. Given the damage to the mount, that its gilded and silvered finish has been removed and that there is little other evidence for trade in scrap metal, the last explanation seems perhaps the most likely.

 

21 April 2015

thistle-headed iron pin

thistle-headed iron pin

Along with the evidence for gold, silver, leaded bronze and iron working, Trusty’s Hill also produced a small but impressive assemblage of metal artefacts. The high quality of the ironwork assemblage in particular, especially given the small scale of excavations, is a good indication of the importance of the settlement here around AD 600.

Two of the metal artefacts really stood out.

The first was a decorative iron pin, recovered from the east side of the summit. It is of early medieval type and is a finely crafted thistle-headed pin. X-rays showed that there were traces of copper alloy inlay within the incised decoration. Decorated iron pins are rare, probably due to the difficulty in decorating iron compared to copper alloy or bone/ antler, which were easier to either cast or carve into intricate shapes. Hammering this small object into such a fine shape, incising the decoration and inlaying the copper alloy required an immense amount of skill as a metalworker and the owner of such an object is likely to have been of a high status. Thistle-headed pins can be paralleled elsewhere in Dumfries and Galloway, in bone from Tynron Doon and in a mould fragment for a copper alloy pin from the Mote of Mark. It is the rare choice of material, iron, which makes the Trusty’s Hill pin particularly special. The only comparably decorated iron pin from Scotland is a drum-headed pin from Howe in Orkney, which has copper alloy inlays on the head and incised decorative bands with inlays around the swollen shank. This form of pin has traditionally been dated on stylistic grounds to no earlier than the seventh century AD, though the Howe pin is from a context dating to between the fourth and seventh centuries AD, suggesting a longer currency.

The other impressive metal artefact was a circular copper-alloy mount, also recovered from the eastern side of the summit. It is decorated with Germanic style birds’ heads arranged around a central boss, with organic remains preserved on the reverse around three copper-alloy lugs, and can be dated to the late sixth to early seventh century AD on stylistic grounds. X-ray fluorescence analysis detected gold and silver on the front of this object, which was probably from a horse harness.

These two artefacts corroborate the radiocarbon dating evidence for occupation of the site around AD 600, and reveal that the inhabitants of Trusty’s Hill included people who had a considerable measure of wealth and sophisticated taste for expensive jewellery with which to ornament not just their own personal appearance but their horses as well.

copper-alloy horse mount

copper-alloy horse mount

25 February 2015

crucible fragments from Trusty's Hill

crucible fragments from Trusty's Hill

Alongside the evidence for ironworking, there was a variety of debris associated with non-ferrous metalworking recovered from Trusty’s Hill. XRF analysis of crucible fragments demonstrate that copper, tin, lead and silver were worked. It is notable that a high proportion of the crucibles show a combination of copper, tin and lead, suggesting the production of leaded bronze objects. The very small size of the crucibles indicates that it was very fine objects that were being created. This is supported by the identification of gold and silver on a heating-tray fragment, and three clay mould fragments. These yielded traces of copper, zinc and lead indicating that all three had been used to cast copper-alloy objects. Most likely these were pins and jewellery given the comparisons one can draw between the Trusty’s Hill clay moulds and clay moulds from other sites like the Mote of Mark and Dunadd.

This evidence for the production of fine metalwork, and not simply the mending of objects, is particularly significant to understanding the status of the inhabitants of Trusty’s Hill around AD 600. By instigating and controlling craft production, the inhabitants here had the power of patronage. Early medieval Scotland was a non-monetary economy so the control of production of high status objects was used to tie individuals into wider socio-political relations. In other words, a chieftain or king who could produce fine objects could attract and gather a large following of clients, who in return for his largesse owed him service. With the increased martial power that might come with a larger following of armed supporters and clients, a leader might acquire more resources with which to attract further clients and followers.

clay mould fragments from Trusty's Hill

clay mould fragments from Trusty's Hill

8 December 2014

stone anvil

stone anvil

This pock-marked stone poking out of the rubble collapse of the rampart on the west side of Trusty’s Hill turned out to be an anvil stone, one of a number of finds examined during specialist post-excavation analysis that demonstrate that iron metalworking was carried out here back in the sixth century AD.

The early ironworking process can be split into two basic stages; smelting and blacksmithing. Smelting involves heating ore in a furnace to produce a bloom of iron, while the blacksmith heats and hammers the iron into an artefact. Smelting slag was recovered from the occupation deposits on the east side of the summit of Trusty’s Hill. Its amorphous shape suggests it was raked out of the furnace whilst still hot and soft, rather than being left to accumulate in the base.

One smithing hearth base was also recovered from this part of the site. Smithing hearth bases are plano-convex accumulations of iron smithing slag which form in the hearth as the iron is moved in and out of the hearth.

Small magnetic flakes of hammerscale become dislodged from the iron’s surface during the hammering and as such are diagnostic of blacksmithing. Trusty’s Hill produced very small quantities of hammerscale but with no obvious concentration indicating the focus of activity.

As is normal for ironworking assemblages, many of the pieces are small and fragmentary iron slag, but a quantity was recovered from the eastern side of the hill.

Though the ironworking assemblage from Trusty’s Hill was small (but then only a relatively small area – c. 1% – of the site was excavated), it provides a valuable glimpse of craft activity during the early medieval period, and demonstrates that repeated blacksmithing as well as smelting (which is much rarer amongst early medieval sites) took place here.

stone anvil

stone anvil

1 October 2014

Inspired and intrigued by Chris Bowles’ talk about Trusty’s Hill at the Scotland in Early Medieval Europe Conference back in February 2013, Richard Strathie went to have a look at the site. We thought the aerial photographs he took of Trusty’s Hill might be of interest, particularly as they show how Trusty’s Hill lies within the surrounding landscape:

1 September 2014

The summary results of the excavation of Trusty’s Hill was published recently in the latest volume of the Transactions of the Dumfriesshire and Galloway Natural History and Antiquarian Society (Volume 87, 2013). This report is intended simply as an interim report, in advance of a book reporting the full analyses and results, to be published by Oxbow Books next year. But it sets out a summary of the findings from the 2012 fieldwork, in particular why we think there is now a compelling case for locating the core of the elusive kingdom of Rheged in Galloway. This is based on the accumulating archaeological evidence emerging from Galloway for a kingdom without an historical record in a blank part of the map of Dark Age  Britain, where Rheged, an historical kingdom without an archaeological record, has long been considered but never proven to be somewhere located. Offprint copies of this summary report are being distributed to the many volunteers and supporters who helped the Galloway Picts Project recover so much archaeological evidence.

If you can’t get hold of the latest volume of the Transactions, then tune into S4C at 20:25 on Wednesday 10 September, where the case is made (in English!) on the Darn Bach o Hanes programme examining Yr Hen Ogledd (The Old North).

Hard copies of Transactions of the Dumfriesshire and Galloway Natural History and Antiquarian Society (Volume 87, 2013)

Hard copies of Transactions of the Dumfriesshire and Galloway Natural History and Antiquarian Society (Volume 87, 2013)

30 July 2014

Revisited Trusty’s Hill recently with Welsh TV company Cwmni Da, who were making a programme on the ‘Old North’ for the S4C series Darn Bach o Hanes (A little Piece of History). With the fantastic summer weather, the site is looking a little overgrown! Would never have guessed we had opened up a few trenches here, which is probably a good sign that our excavation resulted in no damage to the site. Cwmni Da’s presenter, Dewi Prysor, made a herculean effort to climb the hill, due to his recently broken ankle. But I think he was glad he made it once he had reached the Pictish Carved Stone and heard and seen the evidence for why the elusive Dark Age kingdom of Rheged can now be fixed to the ground somewhere for the first time, that is in Galloway. Look out for the programme on S4C in the Autumn!

Cwmna Da TV filming at Trusty's Hill

Cwmni Da TV filming at Trusty's Hill

Cwmna Da TV filming at Trusty's Hill

Cwmni Da TV filming at Trusty's Hill

Cwmna Da TV filming at Trusty's Hill

Cwmni Da TV filming at Trusty's Hill

18 June 2014

Trusty’s Hill has once again been at the fore in Gatehouse recently. Following Stuart McHardy’s talk on the Pictish Carvings at Trusty’s Hill in the Faed Gallery during the Big Lit Festival on 18 May, the Ayrshire Archaeological and Natural History Society visited the town on an outing on 24 May. After visiting the new exhibition at the Mill, local guides took the Ayrshire Archaeological Society members on a guided tour of Trusty’s Hill. Shortly after, on 28 May, 21 delegates from nine EU countries, who were taking part in a Grundtvig Life Long Learning project called Rural Heritage Promoter, were hosted by the Mill on the Fleet Museum, where the Gatehouse Development Initiative used the Trusty’s Hill projects as an example of good practice in making local people ambassadors for their local heritage.

Stuart McHardy's Talk on 18 May

Stuart McHardy's Talk on 18 May

Guided Tour of Trusty's Hill 24 May

Guided Tour of Trusty's Hill 24 May

European Rural Heritage Promoter Meeting at the Mill on the Fleet 28 May

European Rural Heritage Promoter Meeting at the Mill on the Fleet 28 May

16 May 2014

An expanded exhibition of Trusty’s Hill has now opened at the Mill on the Fleet, just in time for this weekend’s Big Lit Festival in Gatehouse of Fleet, and will run until 20th July. This new exhibition builds upon the previous one, by presenting more of the antiquarian background to the site, the processes by which the new finds were discovered in 2012, the forgotten cultural legacy of Rheged and the subsequent emergence of Galloway in the medieval period. These new panels were created for the Gatehouse Development Initiative’s All our Stories HLF project, which sought to build on the local legacy of the dig.  I understand that the Mill on the Fleet aims to add a further section of the exhibition to cover the activities of Gatehouse Primary School and the local volunteer guides who, as part of the same project, were trained to give guided tours of the site. I also understand that author Stuart McHardy is giving a talk on The Picts of Trusty’s Hill at the Mill on the Fleet this Sunday (12 – 1pm), to discuss how his distinctive views of the Picts have led him to an interesting ‘take’ on the importance of Trusty’s Hill. Sounds intriguing!

5 April 2014

I was given a very warm welcome in Gatehouse of Fleet today, when I gave a talk on the excavation of Trusty’s Hill to the Galloway Preservation Society, who have been kind enough to support the Galloway Picts Project, providing funds specifically for publication quality photographs of the best of the finds from the Trusty’s Hill dig. I think the 55 members and visitors who turned up today were engaged by the archaeology that has been unearthed, judging from the number of questions and discussions I had following my talk. A few more of the last of the Discover Dark Age Galloway Leaflets were taken away, hopefully leading to many more visits to Trusty’s Hill in the future.